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Pathfinder Wrath of the Righteous General Mechanics: dice roll, attack roll, save bonus

Dice roll

Dice rolls decide the outcome of every action in the game like damage, dodge chance, save throws, pick locking, trap detection, etc. The in-game system rolls the dice for you and calculate the outcome. You can check the rolls inside the combat information panel.

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Dice rolls are expressed in three different parts: the number of dices that are being rolled, the number of sides of the dice and the added or subtracted bonus. For example if you are attacking with a weapon you can roll for 2d4+1. The 2 indicates the number of dices that are being rolled, the d4 indicates the number of sides the dice has and the +1 indicates the number that will be added to the number the dice rolls. So in this example you will roll 2 dices of 4 sides each, sum the result and then add 1.

Some other examples:

  • 1d6 = You roll 1 dice that has 6 sides. There is no + or – so you won’t add or substrate any number from the result. 
  • 1d8+4 = You will roll 1 dice with 8 sides and add 4 to the result.
  • 2d62 = You will roll 2 dices with 6 sides and sum them up. Then you will substrate 2 from the result. 

Understanding this mechanics is very important as it can help you choose from different possibilities. For example: if you have a weapon that deals 3d6 damage, we can calculate that it can deal between 3 and 18 damage (provided three one or three six). On the other hand we have a weapon that deals 2d10 damage, so we can calculate that it deals from 2 to 20 damage. From here, we can decide if we prefer to have a higher minimum damage or a higher maximum damage.

Die Roll System

The die roll system is confusing to many newcomers. The problem with this system is that it does not always generate a value spread where each value probability is equal. For example, the d20 has an equal probability of generating any integer between 1 and 20. You have 5% chance to get any number from 1 to 20, therefore the same as 1-20.

However, with 2 or more die rolls, converting to a percentage is not so easy. Various values are more or less likely to occur, depending the the value in question. Here is a chart which relates percent probabilities to 2d6 rolls.

Hit Die

This determines the number of faces of the dice that will be rolled when leveling up to determine health points (HP) gained.

d4Sorcerer, Wizard
d6Bard, Rogue
d8Cleric, Druid, Monk, Ranger
d10Fighter, Paladin
d12Barbarian

Skill Checks

To make a skill check, roll a d20 and add your character’s skill modifier. Skill checks are rolled against a Difficulty Class (DC) that needs to be overcome in order to successfully pass the skill check. This can be triggered by a player action (trying to pick a lock) or passively rolled (detecting a secret door in a room).

Attack Roll

When attacking an opponent, roll a d20 and add your character’s attack bonus. If the result equals or exceeds the opponent’s Armor Class (AC), the attack succeeds. On a successful attack, you roll the dice indicated for the weapon you used to determine how much damage your attack deals. Damage reduces hit points (hp).

On an attack roll, a bonus is applied from the appropriate column on the table according to the class to which the character belongs. Whether a character uses the first (good) base attack bonus, the second (average) base attack bonus, or the third (poor) base attack bonus depends on the class. Barbarians, fighters, paladins, and rangers have a good base attack bonus, so they use the first Base Attack Bonus column. Clerics, druids, monks, and rogues have an average base attack bonus, so they use the second column. Sorcerers and wizards have a poor base attack bonus, so they use the third column. Numbers after a slash indicate additional attacks at reduced bonuses: “+7/+2” represents two attacks per round, with an attack bonus of +7 for the first attack, and +2 for the second.

Any modifiers on attack rolls apply to all these attacks normally, but bonuses do not grant extra attacks. If a character has more than one class, the base attack bonuses for each class are cumulative.

Class LevelBase Attack Bonus (Good)Base Attack Bonus (Average)Base Attack Bonus (Poor)
1st+1+0+0
2nd+2+1+1
3rd+3+2+1
4th+4+3+2
5th+5+3+2
6th+6/+1+4+3
7th+7/+2+5+3
8th+8/+3+6/+1+4
9th+9/+4+6/+1+4
10th+10/+5+7/+2+5
11th+11/+6/+1+8/+3+5
12th+12/+7/+2+9/+4+6/+1
13th+13/+8/+3+9/+4+6/+1
14th+14/+9/+4+10/+5+7/+2
15th+15/+10/+5+11/+6/+1+7/+2
16th+16/+11/+6/+1+12/+7/+2+8/+3
17th+17/+12/+7/+2+12/+7/+2+8/+3
18th+18/+13/+8/+3+13/+8/+3+9/+4
19th+19/+14/+9/+4+14/+9/+4+9/+4
20th+20/+15/+10/+5+15/+10/+5+10/+5

Base Save Bonus

There are Fortitude, Reflex and Will save throws. Whether a character uses the first (good) bonus or the second (poor) bonus depends on his or her class and the type of saving throw being attempted. For example, fighters get the lower bonus on Reflex and Will saves and the higher bonus on Fortitude saves, while rogues get the lower bonus on Fortitude and Will saves and the higher bonus on Reflex saves. Monks are equally good at all three types of saving throws. See each class’s description to find out which bonus applies to which category of saves. If a character has more than one class, the base save bonuses for each class are cumulative.

Class LevelBase Save Bonus (Good)Base Save bonus (Poor)
1st+2+0
2nd+3+0
3rd+3+1
4th+4+1
5th+4+1
6th+5+2
7th+5+2
8th+6+2
9th+6+3
10th+7+3
11th+7+3
12th+8+4
13th+8+4
14th+9+4
15th+9+5
16th+10+5
17th+10+5
18th+11+6
19th+11+6
20th+12+6

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